top of page
Transmission -  Hendra Virus
Transmission -  Hendra Virus
In Australia
In Australia
CATS HENDRA.PNG

While the exact route of infection is unknown, it is thought that horses may contract Hendra virus infection from sniffing or eating matter recently contaminated with flying fox urine, saliva or birth products. Spread of infection to other horses can then happen.

 

Spread is possible wherever horses have close contact with body fluids of an infected horse. Small amounts of the virus may be present in a horse's body fluids, particularly nasal secretions, for a few days before they become sick.

Horses can be infected by oronasal routes and can excrete HeV in urine and saliva. It is possible to transmit HeV from cats to horses. Transmission from P poliocephalus  to horses could not be proven and neither could transmission from horses to horses or horses to cats. Under the experimental conditions of the study the virus is not highly contagious.

SOURCE LINK:

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1751-0813.1998.tb12335.x?sfns=mo&

Infected horses can shed the virus in naso-pharyngeal secretions before the onset of clinical disease. By the time the disease is apparent, the virus has spread throughout the horse’s blood, body fluids and tissues. Horses infected with the virus are a transmission risk to humans from 72 hours before the onset of clinical signs up to and after the horse’s death and until the safe disposal of the carcase. The transmission risk increases with disease progression and is highest at the point of the horse’s death and during post-mortem contact.

SOURCE LINK:

https://www.worksafe.qld.gov.au/injury-prevention-safety/hazardous-exposures/biologicalhazards/diseases-from-animals/hendra-virus/hendra-virus-information-for-veterinarians

 

There is no evidence that the virus can be passed directly from:

  • Human to human

  • flying foxes to humans

  • dogs to humans

  • the environment to humans, or,

  • from humans to horses

  • There is no evidence of airborne spread (where tiny particles remain suspended in the air).

 

SOURCE LINK:

http://conditions.health.qld.gov.au/HealthCondition/condition/14/217/363/hendra-virus-infection

BATS TO HORSES

The CSIRO have provided advice that there was no scientific connection between Hendra carried by bats and the infection of horses.

SOURCE LINK:

http://www.scone.com.au/hendra-vaccine-case-update/fbclid=IwAR3Fx6t7Fexz5Q9gNTOFYAZJxyQIhFnkqbdP1Ef7GPmqEeT4lola1zBXTYQ )

 

IS THERE A LINK?   CATS ---> HORSES

SOURCE LINK:

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10219931851030518&set=gm.1762324353913094&type=3&theater&ifg=1

NEXT - GEOGRAPHIC SPREAD - AUSTRALIA

bottom of page