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Human Hendra Cases 
Human Hendra Cases 
In Australia
In Australia

HEALTH.QLD.GOV.AU - SCROLL TO - PUBLIC HEALTH SIGNIFICANCE AND OCCURRENCE

Summary of Hendra virus infection events with numbers of equine cases, human cases, and human deaths, 1994-2011 (to November 2011)

SOURCE LINK:

https://www.health.qld.gov.au/cdcg/index/hendra

 

Hendra Virus tends to attack either the respiratory system or the nervous system. In Australia, the fatal complications have included:

Septic pneumonia – severe lung infection involving pus, abscesses and destruction of lung tissue

Encephalitis – severe brain inflammation and swelling which can lead to convulsion or coma

People infected by the Hendra virus have become unwell with:

an influenza-like illness with symptoms such as fever, cough, sore throat, headache and tiredness (which led to pneumonia in one case)

 

and/or

encephalitis (inflammation of the brain) with symptoms such as headache, high fever and drowsiness, which progressed to convulsions and/or coma.

The time from exposure to a sick horse until the start of illness in humans has varied between 5 and 21 days.

SOURCE LINK:

http://conditions.health.qld.gov.au/HealthCondition/condition/14/217/363/hendra-virus-infection

 

A veterinarian became infected with Hendra virus (HeV) after managing a terminally ill horse and performing a limited autopsy with inadequate precautions. Although she was initially only mildly ill, serological tests suggested latent HeV infection. Nevertheless, she remains well 2 years after her initial illness. Recently emerged zoonotic viruses, such as HeV, necessitate appropriate working procedures and personal protective equipment in veterinary practice.

SOURCE LINK:

https://www.mja.com.au/journal/2006/185/10/hendra-virus-infection-veterinarian?fbclid=IwAR3gGrLoGugbMT99eBTPgClkny1fk_B2D4FScI6KhZRnLZhQypXK4rleZPk

 

HENDRA VIRUS INFECTION IN A VETERINARIAN

A veterinarian became infected with Hendra virus (HeV) after managing a terminally ill horse and performing a limited autopsy with inadequate precautions. Although she was initially only mildly ill, serological tests suggested latent HeV infection. Nevertheless, she remains well 2 years after her initial illness. Recently emerged zoonotic viruses, such as HeV, necessitate appropriate working procedures and personal protective equipment in veterinary practice.

SOURCE LINK:

https://www.mja.com.au/journal/2006/185/10/hendra-virus-infection-veterinarian?fbclid=IwAR0oYhsiiXr8gaPKdb7MqNCVDyRkf6YZBDihsJtNZcn7XijPsDqCLJ_fkzI

 

 

QLD VET DIES OF HENDRA VIRUS   - 21 Aug 2008

It is the first human death from the virus since the mid-1990s

SOURCE LINK:

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2008-08-21/qld-vet-dies-of-hendra-virus/484684

 

HENDRA VIRUS OUTBREAK VET CLINIC FACES LEGAL ACTION- CourierMail - August 16, 2008

SOURCE LINK:

https://www.couriermail.com.au/news/queensland/vet-faces-legal-action/news-story/8eba69367448116715151a3960278ad9?sv=68a6884f75d8753cb88bde9872090100

 

A total of seven humans have contracted Hendra virus as 'spillover' events from infected horses, particularly through close contact during care or necropsy of ill or dead horses

SOURCE LINK:

https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/hendra-virus/en/

 

The few cases of Hendra virus infection in people have resulted from very close contact with respiratory secretions (e.g. mucus) and/or blood from an infected horse.

SOURCE LINK:

https://www.business.qld.gov.au/industries/farms-fishing-forestry/agriculture/livestock/animal-welfare/pests-diseases-disorders/hendra-virus

 

Humans have become infected from handling infected horses (both before and after they develop clinical signs, as well as during autopsies).

SOURCE LINK:

https://ppl.app.uq.edu.au/content/2.40.06-hendra-virus-vaccine-implementation?fbclid=IwAR3-qF3SKe3iLz3hqG40Hrl1zNzvs2Mkd9_1lWh43Snte1JhJxxAnfmDC_w

 

All of the seven cases of human infection with HeV that have been recorded had exposure either during necropsy of infected horses or from close contact with infected horses. In all cases, HeV was not considered as a possible infection, and exposure had occurred before the horse was confirmed to have HeV. Four of these people died as a result of HeV infection. The symptoms in humans may present as severe influenza which may include headaches, fever, sore throat, coughs and tiredness, which can progress to pneumonia. There is also a risk that the infected person may develop encephalitis (inflammation of the brain) (Qld Health Hendra Virus Infection; Murray et al. 1995; Tulsiani et al., 2011). The virus does not stay localised, but spreads systemically throughout all tissue primarily causing necrosis of blood vessels, and oedema in lung tissue (Murray et al., 1995).

SOURCE LINK:

https://ppl.app.uq.edu.au/content/2.40.06-hendra-virus-vaccine-implementation?fbclid=IwAR3-qF3SKe3iLz3hqG40Hrl1zNzvs2Mkd9_1lWh43Snte1JhJxxAnfmDC_w

 

It is important that people who have been in close contact with a horse infected with Hendra virus monitor their health. A person who becomes unwell in the weeks after close contact with an infected horse should contact their nearest public health unit and seek medical advice promptly. Tests may be recommended to rule out Hendra virus as the cause of their illness. In most cases, a cause other than Hendra virus will be found. If Hendra virus infection develops, cases are managed supportively by a specialist medical and nursing team in hospital.

There is no known specific treatment for Hendra virus infection. To date, antiviral medications have not been effective but three people have recovered from infections with general medical support.

SOURCE LINK:

 

YOUNG VET KILLED BY HENDRA VIRUS - August 22, 2008

…..the length of the victims' exposure to the disease appeared to be a factor.

"After six cases, it's very, very hard to know what the cause is ... but there needs to be significant exposure and only people who've had close relationships with horses have been sick or have died,'' Dr Young said.

SOURCE LINK:

https://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/national/queensland/young-vet-killed-by-hendra-virus-20080822-gea9wo.html

 

QLD VET DIES FROM HENDRA HORSE VIRUS -  August 21, 2008

SOURCE LINK:

https://www.smh.com.au/national/qld-vet-dies-from-hendra-horse-virus-20080821-3z4s.html

 

HENDRA VET FACING RUIN  - September 30, 2008

The moves come just weeks after the death of Dr Lovell's employee and close colleague, senior equine specialist Ben Cunneen, who contracted the disease along with another Redlands worker following the first detection of Hendra in horses on July 8.

The female vet nurse, whose identity is not known, is believed to

Dr Lovell is now facing complaints about the hygiene standards of his practice in the time leading up to the Hendra outbreak.

SOURCE LINK:

https://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/national/queensland/hendra-vet-facing-ruin-20080930-geaeiz.html

 

 

SEE ALSO-

 https://www.health.nsw.gov.au/Infectious/controlguideline/Pages/hendra-case-summary.aspx

NEXT - HENDRA – SOME RISK PERSPECTIVE

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